Saturday, February 4, 2017

1881/1422 APRIL FOOLS CANDLELIGHT DO-INS!


1881 Lucinda Jane Saunders Presents
A
Q-Tip's Proclamation About
1422 Jesse Lee Reno Outpost
CANDLELIGHT DINNER
At Crazy Corners Dance Hall & Saloon
AT
24 Loorz Road & Upper Valley Road
In The City of Lovelock
IN
Pershing County
ON
APRIL FOOLS DAY 6022
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

THE BOYS WILL BE PLAQUING
THE UNIQUE AND HISTORIC
PERSHING COUNTY COURTHOUSE
IT IS THE ONE OF ONLY TWO ROUND
COURTHOUSES IN THE COUNTRY
AND
THE ONLY ONE STILL IN USE TODAY!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
DETAILS
$35.00 PREPAY REDSHIRTS
$40.00 AT THE DOOR FOR REDSHIRTS
$60.00 PBCs PREPAY
$65.00 PBCs AT THE DOOR
$70 PREPAY FOR RETREADS/ABLED BODY PBCs
$80 AT THE DOOR FOR RETREADS/ABLED BODIES

*ABLED BODY IS A PERSON 23 YRS OLD AND OLDER AND*
*IS ABLE TO DO A NORMAL DO-INS, NO EXCEPTIONS!*
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
APRIL FIRST, 2017 AT CRAZY CORNERS DANCE HALL AND SALOON
(ADDRESS 24 LOORZ ROAD, LOVELOCK, NEVADA, GPS LINK IS BELOW)

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
PBC/RETREAD CHECK IN TIME: 10:22 THRU 11:22
AT CRAZY CORNERS
*MUST BE CLEAN AND SOBER*
PLAQUE DEDICATION: 13:22
HOCO AT: 15:22
BBQ DINNER AT: 16:22

SERIOUS SHIT
*GRAND COUNCIL RULES APPLY*
*TRAVEL CARDS WILL BE CHECKED*
*ID WILL BE CHECKED*
*THIS IS A PUBLIC DEDICATION!*
*BE MINDFUL TO THE PUBLIC!*
*USE DECORUM, OR BE EJECTED FROM THIS EVENT!*
*NO EXCEPTIONS!*
________________________________



Directions:
CLICK HERE-->CRAZY CORNERS
-Follow I-80 E to NV-398 N/Main St in Pershing County. Take exit 106 from I-80 E
-Drive to US-95 BUS N/Upper Valley Rd 4 min (1.8 mi)
-Turn left onto NV-398 N/Main St 0.2 mi
-Turn right onto W Broadway 0.5 mi
-Slight right onto US-95 BUS N/Upper Valley Rd

MAIL IN ADDRESS FOR PREPAY:
Jesse Lee Reno 1422
PO BOX 17474
RENO, NV 89511


CUT OFF DATE FOR PAYPAL: MARCH 24, 2017, MIDNIGHT

CUT OFF DATE FOR SNAIL MAIL: MARCH 20, 2017

*THIS MEANS: POSTMARKED ON MARCH 20, 2017*
________________________________
DO-INS PREPAY

Saturday, June 11, 2016

Nevada’s Lost Race: The Cannibalistic Redheaded Giants

Many Native American tribes tell stories about the long-forgotten existence of a race of humans that were much taller and stronger than ordinary men. These giants are described as both brave and barbaric and legends often mention their cruelty towards whomever they pleased.

The Paiute, a tribe that settled in the Nevada region thousands of years ago, have an outstanding legend about a race of red-haired giants called the Si-Te-Cah. The ancestors of the Paiute described them as savage and inhospitable cannibals.

In the Northern Paiute language, ‘Si-Te-Cah’ literally means ‘tule-eaters.’ Legend has it that the giants came from a distant island by crossing the ocean on rafts built using the fibrous tule plant.

As odd as it may sound, this legend repeats itself all over the Americas, suggesting it might be an incomplete chronicle of a real event that happened long ago.

In Crónicas del Perú, sixteenth century Spanish conquistador Pedro Cieza de León recorded an ancient Peruvian tale about the origin of the South American giants.

According to legend, they “came by sea in rafts of reeds after the manner of large boats; some of the men were so tall that from the knee down they were as big as the length of an ordinary fair-sized man.”

Could the giants of Peru and the Si-Te-Cah have been survivors of a massive cataclysm who took refuge on the American continent?

Legend tells that the Si-Te-Cah waged war on the Paiute and all other neighboring tribes, spreading terror and devastation. Finally, after years of conflict, the tribes united against their common enemy and began to decimate them.

The last remaining red-haired giants were chased off and sought shelter inside a cave. With retribution in their minds, the tribes started a fire at the cave entrance, suffocating and burning the Si-Te-Cah alive. Those driven out by the smoke were also killed.

The tribes then sealed off the mouth of the cave so that no one might set eyes on those who had once plagued their land. They were all but forgotten until a random event brought them back to light.

In 1886, a mining engineer named John T. Reid happened to hear the legend from a group of Paiutes while prospecting near Lovelock, Nevada. The Indians told him that the legend was real and the cave was located nearby. When he saw the cave for himself, Reid knew he was onto something.

Many Native American tribes tell stories about the long-forgotten existence of a race of humans that were much taller and stronger than ordinary men. These giants are described as both brave and barbaric and legends often mention their cruelty towards whomever they pleased.

The Paiute, a tribe that settled in the Nevada region thousands of years ago, have an outstanding legend about a race of red-haired giants called the Si-Te-Cah. The ancestors of the Paiute described them as savage and inhospitable cannibals.

In the Northern Paiute language, ‘Si-Te-Cah’ literally means ‘tule-eaters.’ Legend has it that the giants came from a distant island by crossing the ocean on rafts built using the fibrous tule plant.

As odd as it may sound, this legend repeats itself all over the Americas, suggesting it might be an incomplete chronicle of a real event that happened long ago.

In Crónicas del Perú, sixteenth century Spanish conquistador Pedro Cieza de León recorded an ancient Peruvian tale about the origin of the South American giants.

According to legend, they “came by sea in rafts of reeds after the manner of large boats; some of the men were so tall that from the knee down they were as big as the length of an ordinary fair-sized man.” Could the giants of Peru and the Si-Te-Cah have been survivors of a massive cataclysm who took refuge on the American continent?

Legend tells that the Si-Te-Cah waged war on the Paiute and all other neighboring tribes, spreading terror and devastation. Finally, after years of conflict, the tribes united against their common enemy and began to decimate them.

The last remaining red-haired giants were chased off and sought shelter inside a cave. With retribution in their minds, the tribes started a fire at the cave entrance, suffocating and burning the Si-Te-Cah alive. Those driven out by the smoke were also killed.


Is this the entrance to the resting place of North America’s redheaded giants?

The tribes then sealed off the mouth of the cave so that no one might set eyes on those who had once plagued their land. They were all but forgotten until a random event brought them back to light.

In 1886, a mining engineer named John T. Reid happened to hear the legend from a group of Paiutes while prospecting near Lovelock, Nevada. The Indians told him that the legend was real and the cave was located nearby. When he saw the cave for himself, Reid knew he was onto something.

Reid was unable to begin digging himself but news spread and soon, Lovelock cave was attracting attention.

Unfortunately, the attention was profit-driven as guano deposits were discovered inside. A company started by miners David Pugh and James Hart began excavating the precious resource in 1911 and had soon shipped more than 250 tons to a fertilizer company in San Francisco.

Any artifacts that might have been discovered were probably neglected or lost.

After the surface layer of guano had been mined, strange objects started to surface. This led to an official excavation being performed in 1912 by the University of California, followed by another one in 1924.

Reports told about thousands of artifacts being recovered, some of them being truly unusual.

Although their claims have not been verified (it comes as no surprise), sources said the mummified remains of several red-haired ancient giants were found buried in the cave. Measuring between 8 to 10 feet in height, these mummies have since been referred to as the Lovelock Giants.

Another intriguing find was a pair of 15 inch-long sandals (picture below) that showed signs of having been worn.

Allegedly, other unusually large items were recovered but have since been locked away in museum warehouses and private collection.

A piece of evidence that remains on-site until this very day is a giant hand print, embedded on a boulder inside Lovelock Cave.


The hand print of a giant

Needless to say, this discovery has led many into believing the Paiute legend of the Si-Te-Cah might be more than just folklore.

Around the same time as the second Lovelock Cave excavation, another dig revealed a set of equally-disturbing finds. According to a 1931 article published in the Nevada Review-Miner, two giant skeletons had been found buried in a dry lake bed close to Lovelock, Nevada.

The over-sized remains measured 8.5, respectively 10 feet in height and were mummified in a manner similar to the one employed by ancient Egyptians.

Another common trait between these mummified giant remains and the ones discovered as far south as Lake Titicaca is the presence of red hair.

While some scientists believe the reddish color is a result of the interaction with the environment in which they were buried, the mummies verify the legends, which described the Si-Te-Cah and their kin as red-haired giants.

Proponents of alternative history believe these violent giants were none other than the biblical Nephilim, the forsworn offspring of the ‘Sons of God’ with the ‘daughters of men.’

If this is true, there’s little chance we might get to see any of the giant mummies. Those interested in keeping history secret will never disclose their location.


Humans are free

Friday, May 27, 2016

General John J. Pershing (1860-1948)

One of the most dashing men ever to wear the uniform, John Joseph "Black Jack" Pershing was the most accomplished and celebrated American soldier of the early 20th century.

But to a young Douglas MacArthur entering West Point in 1899, the name John Pershing most likely elicited fear and loathing, not admiration. That summer MacArthur joined Company A, where stories about their recently departed tactical officer -- Pershing, known to the company as "Lord God Almighty" -- had already become legendary. According to historian Geoffrey Perret, Pershing had been an avid practitioner of hazing as an upperclassman before graduating in 1886. When he returned as a "tac" (in charge of cadet disclipine) in 1897, he took "a perfectly ordinary group of cadets and made them hate him.... Pershing's methods amounted to a caricature of leadership and a living definition of the martinet." Under different circumstances, however, the same iron will and force of personality would propel him to a remarkable career.

Born in a small town in Missouri, Pershing served in the cavalry out West after graduating from the Academy, and later received a law degree from the University of Nebraska. During the Spanish-American War, he distinguished himself commanding a black cavalry regiment at San Juan Hill before sailing to the Philippines in 1899. While there, his work in pacifying the fierce Moros on the island of Mindanao caught the eye of General Arthur MacArthur, the new military governor of the Philippines. Perret writes that by the time General MacArthur introduced his son Douglas to Pershing in 1903, the Captain "was probably the best-known junior officer in the Army." With the stories from Company A still fresh in his mind, Douglas was awestruck by Pershing, whose "ramrod bearing, steely gaze and confidence-inspiring jaw created almost a caricature of nature's soldier." Pershing also noticed the younger MacArthur, noting, "I was favorably impressed by the manly, efficient appearance of the second lieutenant." Their paths were destined to cross many more times.

After serving as military attache to Japan and observing the Russo-Japanese War, Pershing was elevated to brigadier general by President Roosevelt in 1906. As a provincial governor in the southern Philippines, he finished his campaign against the Moros, who by 1913 no longer presented a threat to American rule. In 1916, he gained notice leading a force of 5,000 American troops in pursuit of Pancho Villa and his Mexican rebels. When the Americans finally joined the war in Europe in 1917, Pershing's experience and charisma made him the logical choice to command the Allied Expeditionary Force.

First, Pershing had to build an army almost from scratch, organizing, training, and supplying an inexperienced force that eventually numbered two million. Then, he had to fight a war on two fronts: one against the Germans, the other against his Allies, who sought to fill their depeleted ranks with his fresh troops. But after months of reinforcing the British and French, Pershing's Army started operating on its own in the summer of 1918, and played a decisive role in defeating the Germans that fall. Although MacArthur, who believed the only real soldiers were those at the front, resented the "Chaumont" crowd at A.E.F. headquarters (which included Colonel George C. Marshall), Pershing's was a monumental achievement. What MacArthur failed to realize -- but thankfully Pershing did not -- was that this was a new type of war, the first fully mechanized global war in history, and it required a new kind of soldier.

Pershing rightfully emerged as the most celebrated American hero of the war. Congress honored him by creating a new title, General of the Armies, and he served as Chief of Staff from 1921 to 1926. His reputation was so great that long after his retirement, as the next great war approached, President Roosevelt named George Marshall Chief of Staff largely based on Pershing's suggestion. Given Marshall's sterling performance, this surely counts as one more great contribution by one of America's finest soldiers.

____________

Retrieved from PBS

Pershing County, Nevada

Pershing County is a county located in the U.S. state of Nevada. As of the 2010 census, the population was 6,753. Its county seat is Lovelock. The county was named after army general John Joseph "Black Jack" Pershing (1860–1948). It was formed from Humboldt County in 1919, and the last county to be established in Nevada. The Black Rock Desert, location for the annual Burning Man festival, is partially located in the county.

Lovelock is located 95 miles (1.5 to 2 hour drive) from Reno, Fallon approximately 50 miles, Winnemucca approximately 75 miles, and 196 miles to Elko, NV.

Sunday, May 22, 2016

Grand Council 6021

Grand Council news:

First off, Thank you everyone for your support in our efforts in becoming a Outpost and the support in leading us in the right direction.

We had a meeting with Sonny on friday night in Sonora about what could have possibly happened this weekend. GC was thinking about taking away our Outpost status because of the territory dispute and not having done anything of historical significance plaqued. This was brought up to GC via Sonny about plaquing. Since we do not have any territory what were we to plaque?

ECV is mainly about preserving history, not community services. ECV is in the business of history preservation only. Community outreach is secondary to this.

The results of GC:

We are staying the same (we still have outpost status), we have Pershing county (I just got a huge history lesson from the Samuel Clemens gents about that county), and we are invited back next year.

We will still have our regularly scheduled meetings. Please save your questions for then or call one of us if you want to get more information.

-Glitch

Sunday, August 23, 2015

Historic Reno Arch

The historic arch now located on Lake Street at the Truckee River is Reno’s most recognizable symbol. Fashioned after California city gateway structures, the steel arch was erected in 1926 at the intersection of Commercial Row and Virginia Street to promote the 1927 Nevada Transcontinental Highways Exposition, commemorating the completion of the Lincoln and Victory highways. At a cost of $5,500, incandescent light bulbs announced the exposition with blazing torches bracketing the name “RENO.”

When the exposition closed, the Reno City Council voted to keep the arch as a permanent downtown gateway, and Mayor E. E. Roberts called on Reno citizens to suggest a slogan for the town to be displayed on the arch. When none of the entries proved acceptable, a prize of $100 was offered, and awarded on March 14, 1929 to G. A. Burns of Sacramento for the winning slogan: “Reno, Biggest Little City in the World.” 

With the move to neon lighting in 1934, the slogan was thought to be outdated and was replaced with the single word "RENO" in green neon letters. In response to public protest, the slogan was returned to the arch, in new Art Deco neon lettering. The arch remained unaltered on Virginia Street for the next three decades. By 1963, the community launched a campaign to raise $100,000 to replace the arch in honor of Nevada’s 100th birthday. The old arch was moved to Idlewild Park and replaced with a futuristic model in time for the 1963-64 New Year’s Eve celebration. That arch, modified to reflect its new home, now stands in Willits, California. The arch currently located on Virginia Street was installed in 1987. 

A 1969 street widening project forced the move of the original arch to Paradise Park, and in 1988 it was moved to the city’s storage yard because the cost of necessary repairs was too high. There, it languished in disrepair until 1994, when a movie production company came to its rescue while shooting the film Cobb, about legendary baseball player Ty Cobb. 

The film company restored the arch and placed it over East 4th Street near Valley Road for four days of filming. No sooner had the production company removed the arch than the public clamored for its permanent return. A community-wide grassroots effort was launched, and in 1995 the arch was reconstructed on Lake Street next to the National Automobile Museum, home of William Harrah’s famed automobile collection, where it once again welcomes visitors to downtown Reno.

Saturday, August 1, 2015

Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson (Dec 24, 1809 – May 23, 1868)

Kit Carson (1809–1868) was a frontiersman, western guide, and trapper. He first gained fame as a distinguished guide for explorers in the western frontier, when America had a love affair with the untamed land west of the Mississippi River. Thanks in part to fictional tales and exaggerated magazine stories, Carson's reputation as a guide soon turned to that of legend, and the myth of Kit Carson was born.

Before he became a legend

Christopher "Kit" Carson was born in Madison County, Kentucky, on December 24, 1809. His father, Lindsey Carson, fought in the American Revolution (1775–83), a war in which the American colonies fought to win their independence from Great Britain. He married Rebecca Robinson in 1796. Kit was the sixth of ten children. The Carson family soon settled in Howard County, Missouri. When Kit was just nine years old, his father was killed in a tragic accident.

It is doubtful that Carson received much of a formal education, because he remained nearly illiterate, or unable to read and write, his entire life. At the age of fourteen he became an apprentice (a person who works for someone with a specific skill in order to learn that skill) to a saddle maker. After less than two years, Carson left the saddle maker and joined a group of traders who were on their way to Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Life on the western frontier

Carson's career in the West spanned the years from 1825 to 1868, a period of rapid national expansion, exploration, and settlement. From 1827 to 1829 young Carson spent time working as a cook, driving a wagon, interpreting Spanish, and mining copper. In August 1829 he gained invaluable experience after joining a trapping party bound for California. For the next year and a half Carson trapped animals along the streams of Arizona and southern California.

In 1831 Carson returned to New Mexico, where he immediately joined up with the experienced trapper, Thomas Fitzpatrick (c. 1799–1854). With Fitzpatrick's men, Carson headed north into the rugged central Rocky Mountains. For the next ten years, Carson worked as a trapper all over western America in what is today known as Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana. During this time spent in the wilderness of North America, Carson learned everything he needed to know in order to become a respected guide.

In 1836 Carson married an Arapaho Indian woman. The couple had two children, only one of whom—a daughter—survived. After his first wife died, Carson married a Cheyenne woman. The marriage did not last, and Carson took his daughter to St. Louis, Missouri, to further her education. For the next eight years, Carson split his time between his daughter in St. Louis and his trapping duties in Taos, New Mexico.

A turning point

In 1842 Carson's fate arrived by steamboat when explorer John C. Frémont landed in St. Louis. Frémont came to St. Louis looking to hire the well-known guide Andrew S. Drips to lead his expedition to the Wind River in Wyoming. Unable to find Drips, Frémont chose Carson instead. From June until September, Carson guided Frémont's party west through South Pass to the Wind River Mountains and then back to Missouri.

Over the next several years, Carson, along with Fitzpatrick, worked as a guide for Frémont on three expeditions through Oregon and California. The timing could not have been better for Frémont — or for Carson. The American public was fascinated with life in the West and the tales of hostile Indian tribes and unsettled land that could be found on the western frontier. Frémont's published reports on his expeditions soon became famous, as did Kit Carson. Although many of Carson's adventures would become wildly exaggerated, no one could deny his contributions to the settling of the American West. Many of Carson's accomplishments were popularized in Dr. De Witt C. Peters's 1858 book, The Life and Adventure of Kit Carson, the Nestor of the Rocky Mountains. (By referring to Carson as a nestor, Dr. Peters meant that Carson was is a leader in his field.)

A soldier's career

In 1846 Carson served in California with Frémont at the outbreak of the Mexican War (a war fought between Mexico and the United States from 1846 until 1848 that resulted in U.S. ownership of much of the area that is now known as the American Southwest, which had formerly been part of Mexico). During this time his duties were quite dangerous, as he carried dispatches, or messages, between command posts in enemy territory. When Carson was sent to Washington with dispatches, he was stopped by General Stephen W. Kearny (1794–1848) in New Mexico. Kearny ordered Carson to lead his troops west to California. At the battle of San Pascual (1846), with Kearny's tired men losing the battle, Carson, along with two others, was able to slip through enemy lines to call for reinforcements. Although Kearny's men were unable to take San Pascual, the reinforced army soon captured San Diego, San Gabriel, and Los Angeles, California, in rapid succession. Later, President James K. Polk (1795–1849) called Carson a hero and appointed him lieutenant in the mounted (on horseback) rifle regiment. However, the Senate rejected this appointment, and Carson returned to Taos.

Career as an Indian agent

By 1849 Carson had settled near Taos to farm and do occasional scouting for army units fighting hostile tribes. Carson also served in the Office of Indian Affairs, first as an agent and then as a superintendent of Indian affairs for the Colorado Territory. In 1854 he became the agent for several southwestern tribes. For years, Carson worked to keep peace and to ensure fair treatment of Native Americans.

While working for the Office of Indian Affairs, Carson often clashed with his superior, Territorial Governor David Meriwether. Carson disagreed with many of Meriwether's policies and thought that Native Americans were being treated unfairly. In 1856 their conflicts boiled over when Meriwether suspended Carson. Meriwether later arrested Carson, charging him with disobedience and cowardice. Carson soon apologized and got his job back working as an agent.

Back in the army

With the outbreak of the Civil War (1861–65), Carson left his position with Indian Affairs and was soon appointed a lieutenant colonel commanding the First New Mexico Volunteer Regiment. The Civil War was a war between the northern states and southern states that was fought to decide whether or not slavery would be allowed in new territories, and whether or not the South would leave the Union to form an independent nation. During the war, Carson fought against invading Confederates (soldiers from the southern states) at the battle of Val Verde. Carson also directed successful campaigns against the Apache and Navajo from 1862 until 1864. In his last battle he defeated the Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache tribes in the Texas panhandle. In 1865 he was appointed as brigadier general (an army officer who is above a colonel) of volunteers. For the next two years Carson held assignments in the West until he left the army in 1867.

In 1868 Carson was appointed superintendent of Indian affairs for the Colorado Territory. He never had a chance to work in this position. He died May 23, 1868, at Fort Lyon, Colorado.

Although Carson's later career serving his country in the army and establishing relations with Native Americans was impressive, the name Kit Carson will forever bring to mind thoughts of the wild frontier and westward expansion.

Carson City, Nevada is named after him.

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Rainier Brewing Company Bottling Plant

In 1905, the Seattle-based Rainier Brewing Company announced plans to construct a bottling works and distribution center one block from the established Reno Brewing Company. Located near the railroad tracks at what is now 310 Spokane Street, the structure required a sizeable investment of thirty thousand dollars for construction and equipment, including expensive boilers shipped from Chicago.

Disaster was closely averted in October 1905, just days before the scheduled opening, when a fire, believed to be arson, broke out in the cellar. A Reno Brewing Company watchman discovered the flames while making his rounds up the street and called for assistance just in time.

Rainier Beer was originally shipped to this plant from the company’s Seattle brewery via railroad, and unloaded directly from a spur track to a platform on the building’s south side. The complex included cold, keg, and barrel storage as well as the foreman’s living quarters and stables for the delivery wagon horses.

In 1914, the state of Washington voted to prohibit the sale or manufacture of alcohol, forcing all its breweries to dismantle their operations within a year. In 1915, the brewing of Rainier Beer shifted to San Francisco. The company survived national Prohibition, but the Reno bottling works was forced to diversify its range of products. In 1919, Nevada Supply Company operated from the building, selling non-alcoholic beverages including Rainier’s near beer, a beer substitute called Becco, Brown’s Celery Phosphate, carbonated apple juice, and maple syrup. It also rented out storage space for refrigerated and non-refrigerated food items.

The Rainier plant went on to house a number of businesses from Nevada National Ice and Cold Storage Company to Ice House Antiques. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. Today, it is home to the Spice House Adult Cabaret.